About

The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $4.7 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities and eight state agencies, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.


Universities


Agencies


Executive Committee


Chief Executive Officers


Frequently Asked Questions


More Information

Universities

The Texas A&M University System was created by the Texas Legislature in 1948 to manage the evolution of a statewide educational, research and service system. Its roots lie in the founding of what are now Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University as land-grant colleges in 1876. Today, the Texas A&M System provides oversight and leadership for 11 universities and eight state agencies. Its role is governed by the state’s education code (Title 3, chiefly Ch. 51, Sec. 51.353 and Ch. 85, Sec. 85.17). Responsibilities include system-wide planning, coordination, and execution of the policies of The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents.

John Tarleton Agricultural College at Stephenville (now Tarleton State University) joined an earlier form of the A&M System in 1917. Tarleton State University-Central Texas, an upper-level institution offering bachelor’s and master’s degrees, was established in Killeen in 1999.

The Galveston Marine Laboratory joined with the Texas Maritime Academy in the 1960s to form Texas A&M University at Galveston, Texas A&M’s marine studies branch. Texas A&M University at Qatar was established in 2003 to bring engineering programs and research to the Gulf Region by establishing a branch campus in an area called Education City in Doha, Qatar. Education City is a 2,400-acre multi-university campus housing various American universities.

In 1989, the A&M System increased its presence in South Texas with the addition of Texas A&M International University (formerly Laredo State University) in Laredo, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi (formerly Corpus Christi State University) and Texas A&M University-Kingsville (formerly Texas A&I University). The Texas A&M University-Kingsville System Center-San Antonio, which offers bachelor’s and master’s degrees, was opened in 2000.

In 1990, West Texas State University in the Texas Panhandle city of Canyon joined the A&M System, changing its name to West Texas A&M University in 1993.

In 1996, three other institutions joined the A&M System: Baylor College of Dentistry in Dallas and two former East Texas State University campuses, now Texas A&M University-Commerce and Texas A&M University-Texarkana.

The Texas A&M Health Science Center, also established in 1999, has campuses in Bryan/College Station, Dallas, Temple, Houston, Round Rock, Kingsville, Corpus Christi, and McAllen. Its six colleges are the Baylor College of Dentistry, the College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the School of Graduate Studies, the Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy and the School of Rural Public Health. Other units include the Institute of Biosciences and Technology and the Coastal Bend Health Education Center.

In 2009, Tarleton State University System Center-Central Texas became a standalone university, Texas A&M University-Central Texas. That same year, Texas A&M University-Kingsville System Center-San Antonio also became a standalone university, Texas A&M University-San Antonio.

Each of the members of the A&M System has its own mission, history and goals. The oldest institution and founding member of the A&M System is Texas A&M University, established in 1876. Many of the member universities and agencies joined the A&M System decades after being established. Together, they strive to provide educational programs, outreach and community enhancement services, as well as research that will improve the lives of people in Texas and beyond.

  • More than one in five students in a public university in Texas is enrolled in an A&M System institution.
  • Texas A&M consistently ranks in the forefront among public universities in Texas in retention rates—keeping students enrolled and on course for graduation both overall and for African-American and Hispanic students.
  • A&M System students receive about $580 million in scholarships and grants annually.
  • The A&M System awarded 36,346 degrees in FY 2018.
  • The A&M System’s faculty includes recipients of the Nobel Prize, National Medal of Science, Pulitzer Prize, World Food Prize and the Wolf Prize, as well as members in the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering.

Total Texas A&M University System Enrollment
for Fall Semesters

Agencies

The A&M System boasts 8 state agencies with missions ranging from research to protecting natural resources and communities.

Established by the Texas Legislature in 1887 under the federal Hatch Act, Texas A&M AgriLife Research (formerly the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station) continues to represent a unique state-federal partnership in agricultural research. Texas A&M AgriLife Extension (formerly the Texas Agricultural Extension Service) grew out of the agricultural initiatives of Texas A&M University under the provisions of the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, which provided for cooperative agricultural extension work between Texas land-grant colleges and the United States Department of Agriculture. Texas A&M Forest Service was established in 1914, as a way to provide resources to develop and protect the forested areas of Texas. Today, TFS is charged with conserving and protecting the resources and lands of the Lone Star State. Texas legislators created Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory during the regular session of the 60th Legislature, in 1967; the lab formally opened in College Station in 1969.

The Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station was also created in 1914 with a research and technology transfer mission for the field of engineering. Established five years later, the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service is dedicated to helping develop a highly skilled workforce through technical and vocational training. The Texas A&M Transportation Institute, created in 1950, conducts highway, safety, and other transportation-related research.

In 2019, the Texas Division of Emergency Management joined the A&M System as its eighth state agency. With roots in the civil defense programs established during World War II, TDEM is charged with carrying out a comprehensive all-hazard emergency management program for the State and for assisting cities, counties, and state agencies in planning and implementing their emergency management programs.

Executive Committee

The Texas A&M University System executive committee provides the chancellor assessment, advice and recommendations on issues within the A&M System and the System Offices. The 16-member committee may also aid the Board of Regents in implementing and overseeing strategic plans and policies as they relate to the system.


John Sharp
Chancellor


Billy Hamilton
Deputy Chancellor and
Chief Financial Officer


Jon Mogford
Vice Chancellor
for Research


Ray Bonilla
General Counsel


James Hallmark
Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs

Maria L. Robinson
Chief Investment Officer
and Treasurer

Phillip Ray
Vice Chancellor for Business Affairs
Charlie Hrncir
Charlie Hrncir
Chief Auditor
Stone Mark
Mark Stone
Chief Information Officer

Jenny Jones
Vice Chancellor
for Governmental Relations

Carrie L. Byington, M.D.
Carrie L. Byington, M.D.
Vice Chancellor for Health Services
Copelin Laylan
Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor
for Marketing and Communications
Katherine Banks
M. Katherine Banks
Vice Chancellor of Engineering
and National Laboratories
Stover Patrick
Patrick Stover
Vice Chancellor
& Dean of Agriculture
and Life Sciences

W. Nim Kidd
W. Nim Kidd
Vice Chancellor for Disaster and Emergency Services

Hartman_Greg
Greg Hartman
Vice Chancellor for Strategic Initiatives

Stanton Calvert
Stanton Calvert
Vice Chancellor Emeritus
Frank Ashley
Frank Ashley
Vice Chancellor Emeritus

Chief Executive Officers

The Texas A&M University System chief executive officers serve the chancellor and Board of Regents through their leadership in developing the overall strategic planning of the A&M System’s 11 universities and eight state agencies and ensuring their sustained performance to the maximum benefit of the state of Texas and the nation.

Presidents


Mike Young
Texas A&M University
Michael K. Young
President

Prairie View A&M University
Ruth Simmons
President

Dottavio
Tarleton State University
F. Dominic Dottavio
President


Texas A&M International University
Pablo Arenaz
President
Quintanilla
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
Kelly Quintanilla
President
Mark Hussey
Texas A&M University-Kingsville
Mark Hussey
President
Walter Wendler
West Texas A&M University

Walter Wendler
President
Mark Rudin
Texas A&M University-Commerce
Mark Rudin
President

Emily Fourmy Cutrer
Texas A&M University-Texarkana
Emily Fourmy Cutrer
President

Marc A. Nigliazzo
Texas A&M University-Central Texas
Marc A. Nigliazzo
President

Cynthia Teniente-Matson
Texas A&M University-San Antonio
Cynthia Teniente-Matson
President

Directors


Agriculture and Life Sciences

Stover PatrickAgriculture and Life Sciences
Patrick Stover
Vice Chancellor & Dean

C. Parr Rosson III
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service
C. Parr Rosson III
Interim Director

Stover Patrick
Texas A&M AgriLife Research
Patrick Stover
Director

Tom Boggus
Texas A&M Forest Service
Thomas G. Boggus
Director & State Forester


Engineering

Katherine Banks
Engineering
M. Katherine Banks
Vice Chancellor of Engineering and National Laboratories

Katherine Banks
Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station
M. Katherine Banks
Director

Gregory D. Winfree
Texas A&M Transportation Institute
Gregory D. Winfree
Director


Emergency Management

W. Nim Kidd
Emergency Management
W. Nim Kidd
Vice Chancellor for Disaster and Emergency Services

Frequently Asked Questions

What is The Texas A&M University System?

The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $4.7 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities and eight state agencies, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

When was the A&M System established?

The Texas A&M University System was officially established in 1948. The original members were Texas A&M University, Prairie View A&M University, Tarleton State University, Texas A&M Forest Service, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service (formerly Texas Cooperative Extension) and Texas A&M AgriLife Research (formerly Texas Agricultural Experiment Station).

Today, the Texas A&M System provides oversight and leadership for 11 universities and eight state agencies. Its role is governed by the state’s education code (Title 3, chiefly Ch. 51, Sec. 51.353 and Ch. 85, Sec. 85.17). Responsibilities include system-wide planning, coordination and execution of the policies of The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents.

UniversityEst.Joined A&M System
Texas A&M University 18761876
Prairie View A&M University 18761973
Texas A&M University-Commerce18891996
Tarleton State University 18991917
West Texas A&M University 19101990
Texas A&M University-Kingsville19251989
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi19471989
Texas A&M International University19701989
Texas A&M University-Texarkana19711996
Texas A&M University-Central Texas20091999
Texas A&M University-San Antonio20092000
AgenciesEst.
Texas A&M AgriLife Research 1888
Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station1914
Texas A&M Forest Service1915
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service 1915
Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service1948
Texas A&M Transportation Institute1950
Texas Division of Emergency Management1951
Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory1967
What does “A” and “M” stand for?

Texas A&M, the state’s first public institution of higher education, was opened on Oct. 4, 1876, as the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas. Both Texas A&M and Prairie View A&M owe their origin to the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890, which established the nation’s land-grant college system. When Texas A&M gained university status in 1963, the “A&M” was incorporated into the official name in deference to the institution’s history and traditions, but the individual letters no longer explicitly stand for anything.

What is the mission of The Texas A&M University System?

The mission of The Texas A&M University System is to provide education, conduct research, commercialize technology, offer training, and deliver services for the people of Texas and beyond through its universities, state agencies and health science center.

The A&M System is the state’s land-grant system. What does that mean?

A land-grant college or university is an institution that has been designated by its state legislature or Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. The original mission of these institutions, as set forth in the first Morrill Act, was to teach agriculture, military tactics and the mechanical arts as well as classical studies so that members of the working classes could obtain a practical education.

The A&M System’s agencies, which conduct research and bring practical applications of research findings to the people of Texas, also came out of the land-grant system. There is now at least one land-grant institution in every state and territory of the United States, as well as in the District of Columbia.

How is the A&M System governed?

The A&M System is governed by a nine-member Board of Regents, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Texas Senate for six-year terms. A nonvoting student member was added in 2006. The A&M System chancellor oversees the day-to-day administration, and each of the A&M System’s members has a president, CEO or director.

What is the mission of the A&M System?

The mission of The Texas A&M University System is to provide education, conduct research, commercialize technology, offer training, and deliver services for the people of Texas and beyond through its universities and state agencies.

What does “upper-level institution” mean?

This means that the university offers courses only for junior and senior students (and perhaps graduate students). Students transfer to these institutions after completing their freshmen and sophomore years elsewhere. Texas A&M University-Central Texas is an upper-level institution.

What are the Permanent University Fund and Available University Fund?

The Permanent University Fund (PUF) is a public endowment contributing to the support of certain universities and agencies in the A&M System and certain universities in the University of Texas System. The PUF was established in the Texas Constitution of 1876. Today, the PUF includes over 2.1 million acres in 19 West Texas counties. Mineral income from this land has accumulated over several decades and the PUF was valued at approximately $17.9 billion as of Aug. 31, 2016. All mineral income and all increases in the value of equity investments from PUF capital gains become and remain an inviolate part of the endowment. The PUF’s 2.1 million acres of West Texas land produce two streams of income.  Mineral income remains forever part of the PUF endowment and cannot be expended, but surface income (primarily grazing and surface leasing) flows directly into the Available University Fund (AUF). In addition, financial investments held in the PUF are utilized to provide a payout stream into the AUF. The annual distribution to the AUF is based on a percentage of the market value for the last 12 quarters ended each February. The A&M System may sell debt equal to 10 percent of the book value of the PUF.  The indebtedness is secured by AUF income and among other factors is rated on the stability of the PUF, the quality of its investment management and other commitments of the AUF. The Texas constitution specifies allowable uses of the AUF to include debt service on PUF debt, and support and maintenance for the A&M System Offices, Texas A&M and Prairie View A&M. The following members of the A&M System benefit from PUF bond proceeds:

Texas A&M University

Texas A&M AgriLife Research

Texas A&M University at Galveston

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

Prairie View A&M University

Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station

Tarleton State University

Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service

Texas A&M Health Science Center

Texas A&M Transportation Institute

Texas A&M University – Central Texas

Texas A&M Forest Service

Texas A&M University – San Antonio

System Offices

Does the “top 10” rule for admission apply to all A&M System universities?

Yes. Those who graduate in the top 10 percent of their class from a Texas high school will gain admission into any of the A&M System’s nine universities.

Does the A&M System have a central admissions office?

No, students must directly contact preferred A&M System institution’s admission office. Information about these institutions can be found on the system’s website, www.tamus.edu.

Where can I find out about jobs in the A&M System?

The System HR Office maintains links to all the job opportunities with the A&M System.

Where can I find enrollment and other information for each A&M System member?

More Information

View more information about the A&M System below, as well as resources from the A&M System Office of Marketing and Communications.