NEW POST – Clone

The Texas A&M University System News Release image header. Office of Marketing Communications. 979-458-6023

NEW POST TEXT HERE


About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $7.2 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 152,000 students and makes more than 24 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceed $1 billion and help drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

National Science Foundation is looking to the Texas A&M System to help others protect their sensitive research

The Texas A&M University System News Release image header. Office of Marketing Communications. 979-458-6023

BRYAN-COLLEGE STATION, Texas — A national leader in protecting sensitive research, The Texas A&M University System has been tapped by an independent federal agency to help institutions keep their federally funded research out of the hands of adversaries of the U.S. government.

The National Science Foundation recently granted four awards, including one to the Texas A&M System for $470,808, to create training programs to bolster research security. The NSF said the Research Security Training for the United States Research Community program is designed to strengthen research security in the U.S. while also encouraging principled international collaboration.

“The Texas A&M System is known worldwide for our ability to protect sensitive research being conducted for the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense and other federal offices,” John Sharp, chancellor of the Texas A&M System, said. “We take our job in research security very seriously, and we are glad to do our part to help others keep their work away from our adversaries.”

The National Science Foundation said on its website that the grants will “help safeguard scientific progress and protect U.S. research interests from foreign and domestic risks and threats.”

It is widely agreed upon among U.S. university officials that international collaboration is crucial to scientific advancement and the success of research institutions in the U.S., and one of the primary roles of academic institutions is the free and comprehensive generation and dissemination of knowledge.

Unfortunately, the playing field is not level, and we are struggling to maintain our technological leadership because countries like Russia, China, Iran and others who play by different rules for information-sharing are extracting cutting-edge data, intellectual capital and expertise from the U.S. research enterprise at an unprecedented rate, said Kevin Gamache, associate vice chancellor and chief research security officer for the Texas A&M System.

“The U.S. research enterprise and its funding agencies must combat this illicit technology transfer,” Gamache said. “We must improve the state of security and transparency across the research enterprise to allow us to continue to operate in an open and collaborative environment on the international stage.”

With its funding from the National Science Foundation, the Texas A&M System team will create research security training for the U.S. research enterprise that will play a foundational role in addressing the risks to maintaining the open and collaborative environment that has made the U.S. research community the best in the world. The trainings will be available to researchers, students, academics, research security experts, government agencies and national laboratories personnel.

Led by Gamache, the Texas A&M System group will develop a training module that will focus on properly disclosing information and clarifying the importance of transparency. The Texas A&M team is part of a consortium that includes the Texas A&M System, Texas A&M University, IPTalons, a Texas-based company specializing in intellectual property protection,  and Redcliff Enterprises, a Washington D.C.-based consultancy specializing in research security.

Joining the Texas A&M System, other institutions that received funding include the University of Alabama in Huntsville for $477,403, the University of Pennsylvania for $306,449, and Associated Universities, Inc., and AUI Labs for $499,338.

For more information, visit the National Science Foundation website at https://beta.nsf.gov/news/nsf-2022-research-security-training-united-states.

The University of Alabama in Huntsville team will focus on enhancing awareness and providing online training about existing and emerging threats.

The University of Pennsylvania will develop a training module to assess, reduce and manage security risks to research data.

Associated Universities, Inc., and AUI Labs will create an online tool using hypothetical scenarios and real-world case studies to teach advanced skills.

The Texas A&M System, which conducts approximately $400 million in sensitive research for a variety of U.S. government sponsors, is a leader nationally when it comes to research security. The System is a two-time winner of the prestigious James S. Cogswell Award for Outstanding Industrial Security, earing the recognition in 2015 and 2019. Given by the Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency, the award is for establishing and maintaining a security program that far exceeds the basic National Industrial Security Program requirements and providing leadership to other facilities with security clearance, helping them establish best practices for maintaining the highest standards for security. Additionally, Gamache is often sought to speak about security and testified earlier this year before a committee of the U.S. Senate.


About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $7.2 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 152,000 students and makes more than 24 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceed $1 billion and help drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

Aggies Contribute To Nuclear Fusion Breakthrough

The Texas A&M University System News Release image header. Office of Marketing Communications. 979-458-6023

TEXAS A&M TODAY
Aggies Contribute To Nuclear Fusion Breakthrough

Two former students employed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are among many people with ties to Texas A&M who played a part in the major scientific advancement.

By Mike Reilly, Texas A&M University System Marketing & Communications
December 15, 2022

A color-enhanced image of the inside of a preamplifier support structure at the National Ignition Facility. – Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Kelli Humbird, a nuclear engineer who graduated from Texas A&M University, describes the last 10 days as surreal.

Humbird is a design physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in California. She works on the team of scientists that predicted a major breakthrough in the field of nuclear energy was poised to occur.

And her team was right.

Kelli Humbird, a design physicist at Lawrence Livermore, earned her Ph.D. from Texas A&M in 2019. – Courtesy phot

On Dec. 5, the lab used 192 giant lasers to ignite a nuclear fusion reaction unlike any before in human history. That’s because the fusion reaction produced more energy than it took to start the reaction.

The breakthrough, which was announced Tuesday, will advance U.S. nuclear deterrence and someday could lead to a new, abundant source of clean and safe energy to fuel everyday life.

“After it happened, I barely slept that night,” said Humbird, a Houston-area native who earned her Ph.D. from Texas A&M in 2019. “This is one of those moon landing kind of events. It can’t be emphasized enough how big of a deal this is.”

Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm compared the breakthrough to the Wright brothers’ flight at Kitty Hawk. She and other top Department of Energy officials called it the culmination of 60 years of research and thousands of scientists’ work.

While there is no official count, there is also no doubt that many of those contributing scientists over the years have been Texas A&M graduates working at LLNL or faculty from Texas A&M who have worked closely with the lab.

For example, two Texas A&M professors of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Satish T.S. Bukkapatnam and Yu Ding, have helped LLNL engineer the type of capsule that contained the fuel for fusion on Dec. 5.

Lawrence Livermore has ongoing affiliations with Texas A&M in physics and math, as well as a range of engineering fields. LLNL workers train in high-explosive safety techniques at Disaster City in College Station, which is operated by the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX).

Even Lawrence Livermore Director Kim Budil is a graduate of an executive education program at the Texas A&M Bush School of Government and Public Service, a program tailored to meet the needs of the Department of Energy’s national security labs and facilities.

And then there is Marvin L. Adams, the renowned Texas A&M University nuclear engineering professor who has taken a leave of absence to serve as deputy administrator of DOE defense programs.

National Nuclear Security Administration Deputy Administrator for Defense Programs Marvin Adams holds up a cylinder he says is similar to one used by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories for a breakthrough in fusion research during a news conference at the Department of Energy headquarters on Dec. 13, 2022 in Washington, D.C.
– Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

He took to a podium in Washington D.C. Tuesday and explained to the world the experiment itself.

His role stems from his 30 years at Texas A&M, helping scientists at LLNL and the other national labs tackle daunting research challenges. He and other Texas A&M professors also have mentored generations of engineers, including many playing vital roles at the labs.

“I’m not surprised that Aggies played a significant part in a breakthrough like this,” said Interim Vice Chancellor and Dean of Texas A&M Engineering John E. Hurtado, who worked at Sandia National Laboratories early in his career.

“This is a special place. We have the largest nuclear engineering program in the country. We have renowned professors teaching, mentoring and guiding these students, who then have opportunities to go to the national labs when they graduate.”

Michael Zika, 53, went straight to Lawrence Livermore upon getting his Ph.D. from Texas A&M in 1997.

Now the Deputy Program Director for Weapons Physics and Design, Zika has designed other experiments for the giant facility used on Dec. 5. The National Ignition Facility has the world’s largest, most precise and reproducible laser system. It’s the size of a sports stadium and produces the extreme conditions needed for the most sophisticated experiments.

“This is, literally, center of the sun kinds of extremes,” Zika said. “This is a remarkable facility, a global gem.”

Michael Zika ’97 is the Deputy Program Director for Weapons Physics and Design at Lawrence Livermore.
– Courtesy photo

Zika was Adams’ first Ph.D. student starting in January of 1993. Originally from Ohio, he earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nuclear engineering from PurdueUniversity.

Adams had just joined the faculty after more than five years at LLNL as a computational physicist.

“I went to Texas A&M because of Marv Adams,” Zika said. “He had been doing just what I wanted to do and what I have done in my career. He was — and is — a fantastic mentor and friend.”

Following the Dec. 5 breakthrough, test results were reviewed for several days internally and by an independent outside panel of experts to ensure they were accurate before they were announced to the world.

Humbird and her teammates waited anxiously.

“It was surreal,” she said by telephone from the lab. “After it happened, our team was thrilled. We were exchanging emails and plotting preliminary data onto our expectations. The figures we sent around — everything just kind of lined up. Then it started to sink after a couple days. This looks like it’s going to be a really, really big result.”

Humbird, 31, joined LLNL in 2017 as a student researcher and completed her Ph.D. research at the lab. She also has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in nuclear engineering from Texas A&M.

“I got a fantastic education,” she said. “I was so well-prepared with physics and engineering understanding when I got here. It really kind of surprised me. My favorite part of that university was the relationships that I got to build with my professors. They were never too busy for you.”

Humbird took classes from Adams, who served on her Ph.D. committee and now reviews her work at LLNL.

“It is kind of a joke we share because he was my professor, he graded my exams, he graded my Ph.D., and he’ll just be reviewing me for the rest of my career,” she said. “It was cool to see him up on the stage this week and to know how many students that he’s impacted, inspired and set on career paths.”

https://today.tamu.edu/2022/12/15/aggies-contribute-to-nuclear-fusion-breakthrough/


About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $7.2 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 152,000 students and makes more than 24 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceed $1 billion and help drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

Texas A&M University-San Antonio Presidential Search Committee Named

The Texas A&M University System News Release image header. Office of Marketing Communications. 979-458-6023

BRYAN-COLLEGE STATION, Texas — A 17-member committee has been created to conduct a national search to find a successor to Texas A&M University-San Antonio President Dr. Cynthia Teniente-Matson.

Matson will step down in January after accepting the position of president at San José State University. The Texas A&M University System Regents have named Dr. Linda Schott as interim president.

“Texas A&M University-San Antonio is the fastest growing university in the A&M System,” said John Sharp, Chancellor of The Texas A&M University System. “Selecting a leader capable of taking this campus to the next level is a critically important task. I am confident this committee of local campus leaders and civic icons is up to the task.”

The search advisory committee is charged with delivering a minimum of three candidates to Chancellor Sharp, who will refer one of them to The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents. Regent Mike Hernandez will serve as chairman of the committee and Regent Jay Graham will serve as a member.

Committee members from the university are:

  • Philis Barragan-Goetz, Assistant Professor, Department of Communication, History, and Philosophy
  • Mary Kay Cooper, Director of Alumni Affairs and Staff Council President
  • Walter Den, Professor, Department of Mathematical, Physical, & Engineering Sciences
  • Berenice de la Cruz, Assistant Professor, Department of Counseling, Health, and Kinesiology
  • Megan Wise De Valdez, Associate Professor, Department of Life Sciences
  • Jacob Goldstein, TAMU-SA Junior  in Computer Information Systems and Student Government Association President
  • Jessica Loudermilk, Chief of Staff
  • Leonard Love, Associate Professor, Department of Management and Marketing, and Faculty Senate President
  • Vanessa Quiroga, Executive Director of Community Partnerships & Campus Visit Experience;
  • Adrianna Santos, Associate Professor, Department of Language, Literature, and Arts
  • Darnell Smith, Director of Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreational Sports

Committee members from the community are:

  • Jim Adams, Retired Telecommunications Executive
  • Henry Cisneros, Former Mayor of San Antonio
  • Jane H. Macon, Partner at Bracewell Law Firm
  • Nelson Wolff, Bexar County Judge

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $7.2 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 152,000 students and makes more than 24 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceed $1 billion and help drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

Linda Schott Named Interim President at Texas A&M University-San Antonio

The Texas A&M University System News Release image header. Office of Marketing Communications. 979-458-6023

BRYAN-COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Texas A&M University System Regents voted unanimously Wednesday to appoint Dr. Linda Schott interim president at Texas A&M University-San Antonio. The vote came during a special-called telephonic meeting in which they also voted to appoint a new president at Prairie View A&M University.

Schott’s roots run deep in the San Antonio area: she grew up on her family ranch near Medina Lake and graduated from Bandera High School. She then attended Baylor University, where she attained a bachelor’s degree in history and German, and Stanford University where she earned her master’s and Ph.D. in History and Humanities.

“Dr. Schott is an experienced and successful academic leader who will provide steady guidance at Texas A&M University-San Antonio during this transition,” said John Sharp, Chancellor of The Texas A&M University System.

Schott’s academic specializations are intellectual history and the history of women in the United States. She began her teaching career in 1985 at Texas State University. She also taught at Texas Lutheran University and the University of Texas at San Antonio. She began her administrative career at Eastern Michigan University, first as Director of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program, and then as the head of the Department of History and Philosophy as well as Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Science. She was also the Dean of the School of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colorado.

Schott brings extensive presidential experience to Texas A&M San Antonio. She led a campus in the University of Maine System from 2012 to 2016 and most recently served as president of Southern Oregon University from 2016 to 2021. She retired from SOU and returned to live on the family ranch in 2022 with her husband, Tom Fuhrmark.

“Texas A&M San Antonio has a strong reputation for helping students transform their lives,” Schott said, “and I look forward to working with the faculty and staff there to continue that great work.”


About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $7.2 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 152,000 students and makes more than 24 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceed $1 billion and help drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu