Don’t Bet the Farm on Hemp just yet…

The Texas A&M University System News Release

Texas A&M AgriLife Hemp Team advises curious growers


Hemp for Farmers Video
SAN ANGELO, Texas — Texas farmers soon will be able to legally plant fields of hemp for the first time since the 1930s.

Much has changed since then, but one thing hasn’t: Texas farmers can count on Texas A&M AgriLife for practical information and expert insight.

The Texas A&M AgriLife Hemp Team traveled across the state this winter holding meetings in halls packed full of farmers who paid up to $20 each to learn about the pitfalls and possibilities of industrial hemp production.

See the video at Hemp for Farmers.

“There’s a lot of hype out there about growing hemp, but Texas farmers know where to go for the straight facts,” said John Sharp, chancellor of The Texas A&M University System. “AgriLife experts have advised growers for more than 100 years, cultivating a level of trust and credibility they appreciate.”

Topics covered in the meetings included the botany of cannabis, the cost of growing and processing industrial hemp and expected potential yields, THC and law enforcement and the development of markets for industrial hemp.

“We’re not selling anything,” said Dr. Reagan Noland, an assistant professor of soil and crop sciences at Texas A&M University and an extension agronomist in San Angelo. “The goal of AgriLife Extension is to help Texas farmers make informed decisions.”

Farmers need all the information they can get before they decide to apply for a license from the Texas Department of Agriculture, which is in the process of finalizing the program’s administrative rules and expects to begin issuing licenses and permits by mid-March.

For more information on growing industrial hemp in Texas, including the AgriLife presentation to farmers this winter, visit: https://agrilifeextension.tamu.edu/browse/hemp/hot-topics/

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

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Texas A&M System Invests Half-Billion Dollars in Texas Medical Center

The Texas A&M University System News Release

The Texas A&M University System is building a half-billion dollar complex in the Texas Medical Center area to house its groundbreaking Engineering Medicine (EnMed) program and provide desperately needed housing for medical and nursing students in Houston.

The development project is the largest in the Texas Medical Center area and possibly the grandest in Houston recently. The Texas A&M System’s massive expansion includes three major projects, two of which will be constructed through public-private partnerships, commonly called P3s.

“The Board of Regents of the Texas A&M University System recognized an opportunity in Houston to help Texans and contribute more to the global medical community,” said Elaine Mendoza, Chairman of the Board of Regents of the Texas A&M University System. “We are eager and fortunate to further enhance the world’s greatest medical center through this endeavor.”

Texas A&M University System Chancellor John Sharp said the System is expanding in Houston near the Texas Medical Center to meet the medical needs of Texans. He added that the expansion also provides needed space and facilities for students and professionals who work near one of the world’s most important epicenters for medicine and research in the world.

“Texas A&M’s rise in prominence – especially within the health care arena – is reflected with the aggressive expansion of properties near the Texas Medical Center,” Chancellor Sharp said. “The Houston medical scene is about to see the benefits of Aggie ingenuity and our dedication to service.”

The cost of the complex is an estimated $546 million, including $145 million for the purchase and renovation of an 18-story building, plus $401 million in private sector money to build two new towers.

The new Texas A&M System projects include:

  • EnMed. At 1020 Holcombe Blvd., the Texas A&M System is renovating an 18-story building for students in the innovative EnMed program. The unique two-degree program provides students the chance to earn a master’s degree in engineering from Texas A&M University and a medical doctor’s degree from the university’s Health Science Center. The renovation is expected to be completed by this summer.
  • Student Housing. A P3 project, the new, 19-story building will have 572 units and 704 beds. The facility – at 365,000 square-feet – also will include a 1.2 million-square-foot parking garage with 3,444 spaces. Texas A&M medical students and Prairie View A&M nursing students will be given priority for housing, but students from other institutions could fill open slots, if available. The project is scheduled to be finished in June 2022.
  • Integrated Medical Plaza. Another P3, the new medical office building will take up 587,000 square feet and will be 30 stories tall. It will include a 13-story parking garage. Further, it will incorporate 72,000 square feet of retail space and 8,700 square feet of lush green space. Completion is expected in June 2023.

EnMed brings a totally new concept to the Texas Medical Center area in which students work on new ways to solve complicated health problems. Students will complete the requirements for master’s degrees in engineering and doctorates of medicine, while also being required to invent new devices or processes before they graduate.

Dr. M Katherine Banks, the vice chancellor of engineering and national laboratories at the Texas A&M System, said the new facilities and lab space will allow EnMed students to create the newest medical devices that will help people live longer and lead healthier and more comfortable lives.

“I expect to see transformative ideas generated by Texas A&M’s broadened presence in Houston,” said Dr. Banks, who is also the dean for Texas A&M University College of Engineering.

Adjacent to the EnMed building, the integrated medical plaza and the student housing projects will fill a desperate need for facilities in the area, said Greg Hartman, a vice chancellor at Texas A&M University System and interim senior vice president of the Texas A&M Health Science Center.

“We saw a need for student housing and medical offices in Houston. Plus, our EnMed students needed the facilities to create the latest medical devices,” Vice Chancellor Hartman said. “So, we began the process of expanding the Texas A&M footprint in Houston and I believe the work done by Aggies in Houston will be life-changing for a lot of people.”

The developer for the P3 projects is Medistar Corporation, whose CEO is Monzer Hourani. American Triple I Partners, founded by Texas A&M alum Henry Cisneros, is part of the financing team.

For renderings of the project and photos from the event, please visit https://tamus.photoshelter.com/gallery/TMC-2020/G0000RQjKx1YJyQA/.

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

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Hemp for horses? Tarleton researcher investigating benefits

The Texas A&M University System News Release

Can CBD oil reduce stress and help manage obsessive compulsive behaviors?

Hemp for Horses VideoSTEPHENVILLE, Texas — Hay may be for horses, but — now more than ever — so is hemp.

Using CBD to treat horses with arthritis or anxiety has become mainstream since the 2018 Farm Bill legalized industrial hemp. But does it work?

Researchers at Tarleton State University’s Equine Center are looking into that right now in a unique study that has the attention of horse owners around the world.

“I have just been overwhelmed by the level of interest in this study,” said Dr. Kimberly Guay, who is overseeing the research. “By now, horse owners have all heard the hype about the potential benefits of CBD oil. Here at Tarleton, we are working to give them the reliable data that’s just not there yet.”

See a video about Guay’s study: Hemp for Horses

Guay’s study seeks to quantify how CBD affects inflammation, stress and stereotypical negative behaviors in horses.

Guay and her student researchers from Tarleton’s equine science classes give horses in the trial different kinds of CBD, such as oil or pellets. Then they measure the physiological effects of the non-psychoactive substance on the horses’ heartrate and cortisol levels. They also observe the horses after dosing them with CBD to note its effect on any common obsessive compulsive behaviors common to horses that spend time in a stall or trailer, such as cribbing, which is when a horse bites on a fence or gate.

“We are also tracking how long CBD stays in the horse’s system,” Guay said. “Many people who compete with their horses are interested in using CBD products to reduce stress and inflammation, but many event organizers are still working through their CBD restrictions for horses in competition.”

Horse owners eagerly await the results, which Guay said she expects to publish sometime in 2021.

“Tarleton Texans know how to sort out the facts from the hype,” said John Sharp, chancellor of The Texas A&M University System. “This practical, fact-based research is the exactly the kind of thing folks know they can count on from The Texas A&M University System.”

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

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MEDIA ADVISORY: Feb. 6 Board of Regents meeting at Texas A&M International University in Laredo

The Texas A&M University System News Release

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents will convene in Laredo at 8 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 6 at Texas A&M International University’s Student Center, room 231. The board will immediately recess to executive session.

The Board will reconvene in open session at approximately 2 p.m. in the ballroom. The Board will consider:

  • Approval of a resolution honoring the 50th Anniversary for Texas A&M International University
  • The Quiet Zone Project, which aims to use technology to eliminate or lessen train horn blasts going through four locations at the Texas A&M University campus: University Drive, Old Main Drive, Kimbrough, and George Bush Drive
  • A proposed hotel project on the Canyon campus of West Texas A&M University
  • A six year contract extension for the head football coach at Tarleton State University
  • A proposal to name a plaza at Texas A&M University-Commerce after the late president, Dan Jones

 

Meetings of the Board of Regents of The Texas A&M University System are open to the public except for any posted executive session held in compliance with the Texas Open Meetings Act.

A copy of the full meeting agenda can be found at https://www.tamus.edu/regents/meetingmaterials/regular/

The meeting may be viewed live at https://www.tamus.edu/regents/live-streams/

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

System News Archives

February 2020
M T W T F S S
 12
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242526272829