Texas A&M System Regents Approve 21 Regents Professors and Regents Fellows

The Texas A&M University System News Release

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents has designated 13 faculty members and eight agency service, extension or research professionals within the A&M System as Regents Professors and Regents Fellows for 2018-2019.

“These awards recognize and honor the exemplary accomplishments and contributions of our faculty, extension or research professionals,” said Elaine Mendoza, Chairman of The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents. “Though they vary in focus and location, these individuals exemplify the commitment to excellence in research and service that sets A&M System employees apart.”

The Board established the Regents Professor Awards program in 1996 and the Regents Fellow Service Awards program in 1998 to recognize employees who have made exemplary contributions to their university or agency and to the people of Texas.

This year’s recipients of the Regents Professor Award are: Dr. John Fuller, Prairie View A&M University; Dr. Lih Kuo, Texas A&M Health Science Center; Dr. Farida Sohrabji, Texas A&M Health Science Center; Dr. Beverly Irby, Texas A&M University; Dr. Dorothy Shippen, Texas A&M University; Dr. Clifford Spiegelman, Texas A&M University; Dr. Betty Block, Texas A&M University-Commerce; Dr. Elizabeth Sefcik, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi; Dr. Louis Fry, Texas A&M University-Central Texas; Dr. A. Daniel Hill, Texas A&M University; Dr. Nirmal Goswami, Texas A&M University-Kingsville; Dr. David Allard, Texas A&M University-Texarkana; and Dr. Steve Simpson, Tarleton State University.

Recipients of the Regents Fellow Service Award are: Mr. Danny Nusser, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension; Ms. Kathy Smith, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension; Dr. Wenwei Xu, Texas A&M AgriLife Research; Dr. Diane Hurtado, Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station; Ms. Christine Ramirez, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service; Mr. Jeff Saunders, Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service; Mr. Bradley Smith, Texas A&M Forest Service; and Dr. Beverly Kuhn, Texas A&M Transportation Institute.

The selection process for the awards begins with a call for nominations from the chancellor. Final nominations are put forth to the chief executive officer of each respective entity. They are then subject to a System-level review consisting of academic vice chancellors and past recipients of the awards. Finally, nominations are forwarded to the chancellor and the board for final approval.

To date, 252 A&M system faculty members have been recognized with the Regents Professor Award and 150 agency professionals have received the Regents Fellow Service Award.

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

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PRESS ADVISORY: Texas A&M University System Board of Regents to Meet Oct. 31

The Texas A&M University System News Release

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents will convene at 8:45 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 31 at Bethancourt Ballroom 2300 in the Memorial Student Center on the campus of Texas A&M University. The board will immediately recess to executive session.

The Board will reconvene in open session at approximately 1:30 p.m. During the meeting, the Board is scheduled to take action on construction and building improvements. The Board also is expected hear discussion on System member accomplishments, academic program highlights and important research initiatives. Dr. Harrison Keller, Commissioner of Higher Education, also will offer remarks on higher education in Texas. Further, the Board is expected to vote on the adoption of a resolution recognizing Texas A&M University-Central Texas for completing its first decade as a public, regional university.

Meetings of the Board of Regents of The Texas A&M University System are open to the public except for any posted executive session held in compliance with the Texas Open Meetings Act.

A copy of the full meeting agenda can be found at https://www.tamus.edu/regents/meetingmaterials/regular/

The meeting may be viewed live at https://www.tamus.edu/regents/live-streams/

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $4.2 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities and seven state agencies, the Texas A&M System educates more than 150,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $946 million in FY 2015 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

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October 2019
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Texas A&M-Commerce grad named top urban teacher in the nation

The Texas A&M University System News Release

“If you are coming from a traumatic, impoverished situation, you are my family.”

COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Just three years ago, Dallas first-grade teacher Eric Hale earned his master’s degree in education from Texas A&M University-Commerce to advance his career.

Photo credit: Inside Dallas ISD

Friday, Hale will be honored as the nation’s top educator working in an urban district.

Hale, who teaches at David Burnet Elementary School, has been selected by The Council of The Great City Schools and McGraw-Hill Education to receive the 2019 Annual Queen Smith Award on Oct. 25.

It’s an honor the 40-year-old first-grade teacher never imagined while attending school himself in a high crime, low-income neighborhood in Phoenix, Arizona.

“I grew up in such a rough situation, I didn’t really have any expectations of going to college. I was just trying to not go to jail, or end up dead to be honest with you,” Hale said.

Hale credits his success to a teacher who helped him discover his self-esteem, the support of Dallas Independent School District and a graduate school program that helped him understand the important role of an educator, beyond the classroom.

“At Commerce, I got a much broader perspective, an understanding that education is basically like the lighthouse for the whole community,” Hale said. “I learned that I was more than just a teacher, working in this system.”

That perspective, and his passion for helping others living in poverty, set him and his students up for a lifetime of success.

But Hale didn’t always want to be a teacher. After working his way through school, he got a job in healthcare that paid well, but left him searching for more.

“I was successful, but I didn’t have any passion for it,” Hale said. “And I’ve always had a passion for my community and helping kids who grew up like me, in poverty. Black, white, brown, purple, it didn’t matter. If you are coming from a traumatic, impoverished situation, you are my family.”

The idea of becoming a teacher only came after some serious soul-searching.

“I asked, ‘What can I do that I would love to do, that I feel like wouldn’t just be a job?” Hale said. “The answer was clear: Teaching.”

Hale earned his alternative teaching certificate before entering the masters in educational administration program at Texas A&M-Commerce.

“How I teach is not traditional, but I get phenomenal results,” Hale said. “Everything I do is about building my kid’s emotional, social and then educational self-esteem,” Hale said. “I am fostering leaders. One of the sayings in my classroom is: ‘Speak what you seek until you see what you say.’”

John Sharp, chancellor of The Texas A&M University System, said growing educational and community leaders like Hale is the primary goal of the 11 education colleges in The Texas A&M University System.

“Eric’s story is inspiring, and we are proud to have been a part of it,” Sharp said. “We also hope it will inspire others.”

School districts across Texas are scrambling to hire qualified teachers.

“Every success story starts in the classroom,” Sharp said. “If you want to teach, The Texas A&M University System’s 11 colleges of education across the state can help you make that dream real. We are committed to your success.”

For more information about how to become a teacher in Texas, visit https://weteachtexas.org.

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

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Dr. Carrie Byington leaves in wake of national accolades

The Texas A&M University System News Release

Bryan-born Aggie and physician transforming healthcare leadership
 
COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Born in Bryan and raised in South Texas, Dr. Carrie L. Byington ‘85 was the first Hispanic woman to be dean of a U.S. medical school just three years ago.
 
Now the former dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine, Dr. Byington is set to transform the largest system of medical schools in the country as she takes the reigns of University of California Health on Oct. 31.
 
Dr. Byington departs Aggieland in a wake of national accolades. She was the Elizabeth Blackwell Visiting Scholar at the Mayo Clinic and presented at Grand Rounds in September, an event honoring Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to earn a medical degree in the United States.
 
In October, Dr. Byington will be a plenary speaker at the 22nd Annual 2019 FOCUS on Health and Leadership for Women Conference at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
 
Dr. Byington also will receive the Marion Spencer Fay Award by Drexel University College of Medicine’s Institute for Woman’s Health and Leadership in October. She says she looks forward to discussing values driven leadership as a vital component for healthcare transformation in the 21st Century when she receives the honor.
 
Dr. Byington’s success can be attributed to six leadership lessons she has learned, and frequently shares with others:
  • Hold on to your values.
  • Be fearless — cross borders to learn from others.
  • Be persistent — see opportunities in challenges.
  • Step up — advocate for others — patients, students and trainees come first.
  • Be bold — invent the future.
  • Let your life experiences and skills shape your unique leadership contributions.
 
“By any measure, Dr. Carrie Byington is a nationally-recognized leader in pediatrics and infectious disease, renowned for her contributions in patient care, disease prevention and health education,” said John Sharp, Chancellor for The Texas A&M University System. “It’s really no surprise that a strong, Texas woman is transforming healthcare leadership.”
 
During her time in College Station, Dr. Byington also held the titles of Senior Vice President of the Texas A&M University Health Science Center and Vice Chancellor for Health Services at The Texas A&M University System.
 
About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $4.7 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities and seven state agencies, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.
 
Contact: Tim Eaton
Executive Director, of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6018

 

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Fitbits for cows: A&M researcher milks new technology for higher yields, happier cows

The Texas A&M University System News Release

STEPHENVILLE, Texas — More than half of Americans now track their daily activities with some kind of wearable device in an effort to stay healthy.

In the future, so will most dairy cows.

Researchers at Tarleton State University’s Southwest Regional Dairy Center in Stephenville say that digitally tracking diary cows’ eating, sleeping and other movements helps them take better care of the herd they milk three times a day.

Click here for video.

“We have two fitbits on every cow,” said Dr. Barbara Jones, director of the largest university the dairy operation in the Southwest. “They help us to monitor their health, and to keep them content. And that matters to us because we truly do care about cows, as all producers do.”

One of the wearable devices monitors how long the cows eat, how long they lay down or how many steps they take. The other is networked with the milk parlor, allowing researchers to track precisely how much milk each of the cows give.

The data alerts dairy producers when a cow may not be feeling well, before she shows it, allowing them to segregate the ill cow for treatment.

It also frees up time for the dairy producer, who can tend to other business instead of monitoring their therd visually.

Only about 10 percent of dairy farmers use wearable technology now. But as labor costs rise, you can expect more dairy producers to take the technological leap, Jones said.

“The research we do here helps to make sure the cows stay content and happy,” Jones said. “That not only benefits the animal, it makes life easier for the producer, and allows them to make better decisions on the farm.”

About The Texas A&M University System
The Texas A&M University System is one of the largest systems of higher education in the nation, with a budget of $6.3 billion. Through a statewide network of 11 universities, a comprehensive health science center, eight state agencies, and the RELLIS Campus, the Texas A&M System educates more than 153,000 students and makes more than 22 million additional educational contacts through service and outreach programs each year. System-wide, research and development expenditures exceeded $996 million in FY 2017 and helped drive the state’s economy.

Contact: Laylan Copelin
Vice Chancellor of Marketing and Communications
(979) 458-6425
(512) 289-2782 cell
lcopelin@tamus.edu

 

System News Archives

October 2019
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 123456
78910111213
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